Play a game with our Signals of change

Sensemaking / Play a game with our Signals of change

These signs of a changing world may seem small and unrelated, but imagine if they were the new normal: what far-reaching impacts might they have?

By Anna Simpson / 22 Mar 2016

What do some of the last year's most shared and discussed signals of change mean for empowerment - as in, our power to choose the future we want? They raise questions at a deeply personal level: for our identity, our health, our ability to make decisions. And they expose connections causalities between systems we once thought of as distinct, such as food and energy – or climate and peace. They may seem unrelated, but that's what's interesting in a connected world.

How might a simple app that allows workers to voice their concerns influence the seafood industry, for instance? When we choose what to eat, should we think about the conflict implications, as well as the carbon emissions? What messages do you find in the margins?

[#signalofchange 1] Methane: Future of fish feed?

FeedKind is a new fish and animal feedstock product which uses methane gas, partially from gas pipelines and partially in the form of biogas released from the anaerobic digestion of waste organic material. This product is currently in pre-production phase, and will be released into the European feedstock markets from the beginning of 2018. More here.

Image Credit: Masakazu Matsumoto / Flickr

[#signalofchange 2] Transparency tools go directly to workers on their mobiles

new wave of supply chain transparency tools could help cut through opaque enforcement of standards by going directly to workers. LaborVoices and Good World Solutions are leveraging the ubiquity of mobile phone ownership to harness workers as witnesses: their tools allow them to report issues anonymously and create real time information for buyers on workers’ rights, conditions and workplace safety. More here.

Image Credit: ILO in Asia and the Pacific/Flickr

[#signalofchange 3] Australian cattle board 747 to China

On October 21, 150 live cattle were flown from Australia to China for slaughter on a Boeing 747 cargo plane. Crates containing the animals were placed on the plane’s cargo deck in Melbourne and delivered to the inland city of Chongqing, where the Chinese authorities found them all to be healthy. More here.

Image credit: Marc Dalmulder / Flickr

[#signalofchange 4] Climate change found to increase conflict and violence

A growing field of research is finding correlations and connections between climate change and outbreaks of human conflict. A working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER),  reviewed 55 studies into climate change and cases of human conflict. The statistical analysis concluded that changes in temperatures and precipitation patterns systematically increase the risk of both inter-personal violence (murder, rape, assault) and inter-group (civil conflict, war) violence. More here.

Image credit: Al Jazeera English / Flickr

What messages do you find in the margins of these Signals of Change? Share your findings in the comments box or join the discussion on social media with #signalsofchange.

Header art by Oren Goran.

What might the implications of this be? What related articles have you seen?

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