Seacombe West: Australia’s first regenerative community

Resource / Seacombe West: Australia’s first regenerative community

By Heidi Hauf / 18 May 2017

Seacombe West aspires to create a community that fosters a love of place and encourages those who live there to value it for more than just the capital value of their property. Located to the southern edge on Lake Wellington, Gippsland Lakes system, Seacombe West has suffered from significant ecological degradation.  It is being redeveloped through a Masterplanning process that uses a Regenerative Development framework.

The overall design of the masterplan for Seacombe includes regenerating land that has been affected by salinity from a channel cut between the fresh water lakes and the adjacent estuary in 1800s, leaving one-third of the site for regenerative agriculture and around one-third for ongoing ecological restoration, research, tourism and nature reserve.  Housing will be located on ‘the worst land’ and ecological restoration will be part of the lot development process. The total site is 680 hectares in size, and the proportion set aside for housing is roughly the size of four Melbourne city centres. The aim is to provide a mix of housing types ranging in price from $300,000 to $1 million, with either waterside outlooks or clustered in “agrihoods” where food is grown on-site.A wide variety of stakeholders have been involved in co-creating design concepts and ideas for the plan, including community members, academics, designers, government representatives, indigenous leaders, students and experts.

A wide variety of stakeholders have been involved in co-creating design concepts and ideas for the plan, including community members, academics, designers, government representatives, indigenous leaders, students and experts. The facilitation process produced an aboriginal sense of place - a historic timeline extending to 67,000 years ago - to help prioritise the aims and design guidelines of the redevelopment.

The Thrive Research Hub at the University of Melbourne is using the Seacombe redevelopment to explore ways and strategies for fostering regenerative development.

You can read more about the methodology and site development on the Thrive website: http://www.thrive-research.com.au/projects/seacombe-west-australias-first-regenerative-community/

What might the implications of this be? What related resources have you seen?

Please register or log in to comment.

Suggested