Carbon-neutral eggs on sale in the Netherlands

Signal of change / Carbon-neutral eggs on sale in the Netherlands

By Jane Boswell / 24 Nov 2017

A Dutch farm concerned about food system sustainability has developed a new approach to egg production.

Instead of feeding chickens with human-grade corn, Kipster farm creates chicken feed out of edible items such as broken biscuits, rice cakes and other leftovers from local bakeries that cannot be sold and would otherwise be thrown away. This prevents competition between humans and animals for the same food sources.

Farmer and lecturer Ruud Zanders – who developed the system – is driven by a desire to contribute to a more sustainable food system. In a further effort to limit the farm’s climate change impact, he has also installed solar panels to provide energy for the farm itself.

The farm’s ‘carbon-neutral eggs’ are now stocked in a range of Dutch food stores.

So what?

Zanders claims that, under normal egg production methods, 70% of the carbon footprint of eggs is attributable to feed for the chickens.  

The system he has developed reflects a growing recognition of systemic flaws of our food system, and the need for a new approach if food supply is to be able to keep pace with projected future demand.


This signal of change was spotted by Simon Billing:

"This is a really cool farm in the Netherlands:"

One step beyond organic or free-range: Dutch farmer's chickens lay carbon-neutral eggs

There's the much-criticised battery hen egg, and then the pricier organic and free-range varieties. But for the truly ethically committed, how about the carbon-neutral egg, laid in what has been billed as the world's most environmentally friendly farm? Dutch stores are now selling so-called " Kipster eggs " laid at a shiny new farm near the south-eastern city of Venray.

What might the implications of this be? What related signals of change have you seen?

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